Women in NREGA: Issue of Child care (Case studies from Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh) – 2013
 



 

Strengthening Legal entitlements for Children under Six- A consultation report (in collaboration
with Alliance for Right to ECCD) -2013

 


 

A primer on ECCD- 2011
 


 

Proceedings of the Regional Consultations on the Status of Young child in India, 2010
 


 

Undoing our Future- A report on the status of Young child in India, 2009
 


 

Undoing our Future- A report on the status of Young child in India, 2009, a summary report in English and Hindi
 


 

ECCD Matters- A report of the National consultation, 2006
 



 

Looking to the Future- Collective strategies to combat declining sex ratio- National consultation,
2005
 


 

A Social Audit of ICDS in the State of Uttar Pradesh- A study by FORCES, 2005
 


 

A Social Audit of ICDS in the State of Bihar - A study by FORCES, 2005
 


 

The Status of the Young Child in Rajasthan- A study by FORCES, 2005
 


 

Report of the Third National Consultation, 8-10, September, 1997
 


 

Network to Movement: A report on the FORCES meeting and workshop, CWDS, 1994
 


 

Commitments to Children: Miles to Go- report of a sub regional workshop on Rights of the Child in the context of Social Development, CWDS, 1994
 


 

Whither Child care, CWDS, 1991
 




 

Need Assessment for Creches and Child Care Services, Commissioned by the Ministry for Women and Child Development, Government of India

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Women in NREGA: Issues of Child Care
Case Studies from Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh

The case studies looks into the NREGA Scheme with a focus on the status of child care services at worksites of the narega, status of facilities available to women workforce including changes occurring in the lives of women after accessing this scheme, status of migration and availability of facilities at the work sites. The study is also aimed at assessing the opinion of job-card holders and also the role of Panchayats in the implementation of NREGA. The overall purpose of this study is to capture the impact of the scheme, views and feed­back of the beneficiaries on various facets of implementation of the scheme at grass root level right from the stage of issue of job cards. Both awareness and availability of provisions are crucial indicators that impact women’s decisions to bring children to the worksite, and vice versa. This is the primary dilemma thrown into sharp relief by this study - if more women bring their children to the worksite; the availability of baby crèche facilities is bound to increase. On the other hand, only if more crèches become available at the work site will women bring their children to work with them. Childcare provision can work as a primary motivation for greater female participation in the NREGS. Majority of women admitted that the work opportunities provided under the NREGA was made less attractive because of the absence/insufficiencies of childcare at worksites. The gram panchayat’s role in disseminating information about the NREGS’ provisions related to women and childcare has been negligible in all the states surveyed. Another allied finding that has emerged from this study is the derelict state of the ICDS and women’s dissatisfaction with the coverage, quality and working hours of the anganwadi / balwadi centres was universal.

 

The programme has benefited the socially marginalized, but in different ways. In Jharkhand, 16% of the respondents were below the age of 18, pointing to a significant adolescent participation in the NREGA. Tribal and Muslim women have remained outside its reach. In Uttar Pradesh, female participation is abysmally low. Despite the provision of 1/3rd wage employment for women, their share is less than 1/4th of the workforce. In comparison, Rajasthan illustrates the highest percentage of female participation in the NREGS workforce. BPL families comprised a large share of the workforce in all three states. Acquaintance with the rules and regulations of the NREGA and ease of usage varies considerably across states and across districts, affecting differentiated relief outcomes. However, awareness of provisions did not always coincide with the availability of the same. For example, 53% of the sample in Udaipur district was aware of the provision of crèche facilities, but only.7% said that a crèche was actually available at their worksite. In Uttar Pradesh, not a single worksite in the three districts surveyed, were found to have a crèche facility for women workers. Only 8% were aware of the facility, and when informed by the survey team, an additional 20% of the respondents over and above the 71% already engaged in NREGS works, expressed their willingness to work under the scheme if crèches were provided.

 

Both awareness and availability of provisions are crucial indicators that impact women’s decisions to bring children to the worksite, and vice versa. This is the primary dilemma thrown into sharp relief by this study - if more women bring their children to the worksite; the availability of baby crèche facilities is bound to increase. On the other hand, only if more crèches become available at the work site will women bring their children to work with them. Childcare provision can work as a primary motivation for greater female participation in the NREGS.

 

The gram panchayat’s role in disseminating information about the NREGS’ provisions related to women and childcare has been negligible in all three states surveyed. Another allied finding that has emerged from this study is the derelict state of the ICDS and women’s dissatisfaction with the coverage, quality and working hours of the anganwadi / balwadi centres was universal.

 

The findings of this study will also be shared at the grassroots level for better advocacy directed to spreading awareness about the NREGA’s provisions especially with regard to childcare, so as enable women to participate in the programme without being forced to compromise on their children’s health and well-being.

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Undoing our Future: A Report on the Status of the Young Child in India

 


This report on the conditions and status of the very young children in the 0-6 age group in India has been prepared in the context of the periodic review process of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). The report itself has evolved through a process of consultations and dialogue among different kinds of practitioners concerned with child care and development in India. Our focus is on the very young child as we believe that this most crucial and formative stage in a child’s development needs special and specialised attention. As a citizens’ review, it has adopted a critical perspective which is a useful tool and method of arriving at a true picture of the status of the young child in India, of developing and enhancing an understanding of the issues involved, and of generating public demand without which the rights enunciated in both the Indian Constitution and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) cannot achieve their full potential. The perspective takes a holistic view that the condition, status and destiny of young children is constantly affected by and indeed closely interconnected with the overall social, economic, political and cultural developments in the country; even as they have special needs but voiceless and mediated rights to care, to health, to educational and cultural development, and to freedom from discrimination, all of which cannot be subsumed or assumed to be provided for within the general or natural social order of things.

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Proceedings of the Regional Consultations on
the Status of the Young Child
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A Primer on ECCD: A Booklet (Hindi)(English)

This booklet is developed with an objective to create awareness on the issues affecting the young child. The focus is to understand how the environment of early development related to pre natal environment and post natal care and child caring practices affect the survival, growth and development during early years. It attempts to delineate strategies to facilitate optimal development of the child within the framework of lifecycle and rights approach. The text of this booklet has been organized under the basic sub stages of the lifecycle approach to sensitize and build the technical capacities of the partner organizations to enable them to provide age appropriate interventions for improving child survival, growth and development.

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  Enhancing Child Protection Through Early Childhood care and Development (ECCD)
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Undoing our Future: Summary of the Report on the Status of the Young Child in India
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Media Advocacy on Early Childhood Care and Development (2005-2008: Process Documentation)
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Bachpan: Story Book on Anganwadi
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  FORCES is an advocacy network which is committed to the survival, protection and holistic development of the young child